Information Flows on Mobiles

The idea to use mobile phones (here and here) to help economic development in the most remote corners of the world is fascinating and definitely smart. For one thing, mobile phones have already reached the Bottom Billion. In 2007 there were 45 subscribers per 100 inhabitants in the developing countries. That means that we can now expect to have one mobile in every family. Everywhere. As well in communities where services like water, electricity, hospitals, schools or transportation are still far away.

What poor people mostly need are functioning institutions. And market is one of these. If market is not working, farmers will pay higher prices for what they buy and got less money for what they sell.  Moreover they could buy or sell at the wrong time and possibly in the wrong place. In the words of the government of Rwanda,

the success of these farmers has been greatly affected by lack of access to pricing information. Many times, farmers speculate what crops to grow and what prices to charge at harvest. Some farmers depend on middlemen to dictate the prices and in most cases the latter exploit the former. For any farmer to earn a decent living from agriculture, easy access to information on market prices is of paramount importance.

Making information flows on mobile phones could

empower farmers to enable them make more informed market pricing decisions and ultimately more successful farming.

The idea of mobile banking goes in the same direction: making a  service so critical for development accessible to almost everyone. That will not end poverty, but  will probably make the task easier.

Thursday, 16 April 2009

tweets


Twitter: frbailo

links


blogroll


RSS r-bloggers.com

  • Mapping Covid-19 cases: a Shiny app
    R lets you create charts and graphs in image form. But the Shiny package lets you create those same charts and graphs in interactive format. I created my first Shiny chart: a world map of confirmed Covid-19 cases. Check it out here. Unfortunately I cannot embed the app into this website right now, so the […]
  • SR2 Chapter 3 Medium
    SR2 Chapter 3 Medium Posted on 5 April, 2020 by Brian Tags: statistical rethinking, solutions, grid approximation, posterior probability, posterior predictive probability, hpdi, binomial Category: statistical-rethinking-2 Here’s my solution to the medium exercises in chapter 3 of McElreath’s Statistical Rethinking, 2nd edition. \(\DeclareMathOperator{\dbinomial}{Binomial} \DeclareMathOperator{\dbernoulli}{Bernoulli} \DeclareMathOperator{\dpoisson}{Poisson} \DeclareMathOperator{\dnormal}{Normal} \DeclareMathOperator{\dt}{t} \DeclareMathOperator{\dcauchy}{Cauchy} \DeclareMathOperator{\dexponential}{Exp} \DeclareMathOperator{\duniform}{Uniform} \DeclareMathOperator{\dgamma}{Gamma} \DeclareMathOperator{\dinvpamma}{Invpamma} \DeclareMathOperator{\invlogit}{InvLogit} \DeclareMathOperator{\logit}{Logit} \DeclareMathOperator{\ddirichlet}{Dirichlet} […]
  • On the “correlation” between a continuous and a categorical variable
    Let us get back on the Titanic dataset, loc_fichier = "http://freakonometrics.free.fr/titanic.RData" download.file(loc_fichier, "titanic.RData") load("titanic.RData") base = base[!is.na(base$Age),] On consider two variables, the age (the continuous one) and the survivor indicator (the qualitative one) X = base$Age Y = base$Survived It looks like the age might be a valid explanatory variable in the logistic regression, summary(glm(Survived~Age,data=base,family=binomial)) […]
  • D is for dummy_cols
    For the letter D, I'm going to talk about the dummy_cols functions, which isn't actually part of the tidyverse, but hey: my posts, my rules. This function is incredibly useful for creating dummy variables, which are used in a variety of ways, including...
  • Caching in R
    Introduction Caching intermediate objects in R can be an efficient way to avoid re-evaluating long-running computations. The general process is always the same: run the chunk of code once, store the output to disk, and load it up the next time the same chunk is run. There are, of course, multiple packages in R to […]

RSS Simply Statistics

  • Is Artificial Intelligence Revolutionizing Environmental Health?
    NOTE: This post was written by Kevin Elliott, Michigan State University; Nicole Kleinstreuer, National Institutes of Health; Patrick McMullen, ScitoVation; Gary Miller, Columbia University; Bhramar Mukherjee, University of Michigan; Roger D. Peng, Johns Hopkins University; Melissa Perry, The George Washington University; Reza Rasoulpour, Corteva Agriscience, and Elizabeth Boyle, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. […]
  • You can replicate almost any plot with R
    Although R is great for quickly turning data into plots, it is not widely used for making publication ready figures. But, with enough tinkering you can make almost any plot in R. For examples check out the flowingdata blog or the Fundamentals of Data Visualization book. Here I show five charts from the lay press […]
  • So You Want to Start a Podcast
    Podcasting has gotten quite a bit easier over the past 10 years, due in part to improvements to hardware and software. I wrote about both how I edit and record both of my podcasts about 2 years ago and, while not much has changed since then, I thought it might be helpful if I organized […]

RSS Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science

  • Career advice for a future statistician
    Gary Ruiz writes: I am a first-year math major at the Los Angeles City College in California, and my long-term educational plans involve acquiring at least one graduate degree in applied math or statistics. I’m writing to ask whether you would offer any career advice to someone interested in future professional work in statistics. I […]
  • Interesting y-axis
    Merlin sent along this one: P.S. To be fair, when it comes to innumeracy, whoever designed the above graph has nothing on these people. As Clarissa Jan-Lim put it: Math is hard and everyone needs to relax! (Also, Mr. Bloomberg, sir, I think we will all still take $1.53 if you’re offering).
  • Model building is Lego, not Playmobil. (toward understanding statistical workflow)
    John Seabrook writes: Socrates . . . called writing “visible speech” . . . A more contemporary definition, developed by the linguist Linda Flower and the psychologist John Hayes, is “cognitive rhetoric”—thinking in words. In 1981, Flower and Hayes devised a theoretical model for the brain as it is engaged in writing, which they called […]