Detained and Dismissed

Human Rights Watch has just published a detailed report on Women’s Struggles to Obtain Health Care in United States Immigration Detention. Immigration detention facilities are black holes all around the world. For one thing it is difficult to understand or explain why a state should imprison somebody who has committed no crime at all. At least for those who tend to consider existing as a right and not as a crime. HRW writes that in the United States

the number of individuals held in administrative detention while their immigration cases are determined has skyrocketed in recent years. The detained population on any given day is now over 29,000 nationwide, up almost 50 percent from 2005.

And according to the report the overshadowing sanitary problems for women in this condition are

delays and denials of testing and treatment, obstacles to obtaining medical care, distortions in the doctor-patient relationship, detrimental and unnecessary use of restraints and strip searches, discontinuity of care, lack of effective remedies.

Wednesday, 18 March 2009

tweets


Twitter: frbailo

links


blogroll


RSS r-bloggers.com

RSS Simply Statistics

RSS Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science

  • The cleantech job market: Every modeler is supposed to be a great Python programmer.
    This post is by Phil Price, not Andrew. I’ve had a run of luck ever since I left my staff scientist position at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to become a freelance consultant doing statistical modeling and forecasting, mostly related to electricity … Continue reading →
  • J. K. Rowling (2) vs. Joan Didion; Arnold advances
    Our most recent competition was close. Ethan goes for Mr. 22 based on the duplication of duplicate names: Well Benny can stretch to a double major – Major General for us, working with the Brit’s Major Andre. But that’s not … Continue reading →
  • Do doctors get too little respect nowadays? Or too much?
    This news article laments that doctors don’t get enough respect: ‘Kind of Awkward’: Doctors Find Themselves on a First-Name Basis . . . Female doctors were more than twice as likely as male doctors to be addressed by their first … Continue reading →