Wars in the Backyard

The National Security Archive has just declassified eleven documents on the extra judicial arrests conducted 25 years ago by the government of Guatemala. It appears that the US embassy clearly knew that the security forces were involved in the kidnappings. In a Department of State secret report, dated March 1986, we can read:

While criminal activity accounts for a small percentage of the cases, and from time to time individuals “disappear” to go elsewhere, the security forces and rightist paramilitary groups are responsible for most kidnapping. Insurgent groups do not normally use kidnapping as a political tactic, although they did resort to kidnapping for ransom in their formative years.
First used systematically by security forces against Communist Party and members of the moderate left beginning in 1966, the practice of kidnapping became institutionalized over time. Some 6500 persons have been kidnapping or disappeared since 1977, far short of the 38,000 claimed by critics of the previous Guatemalan governments. The average number of monthly kidnapping peaked in 1984 under regime of General Mejia. At first security forces utilized kidnappings to intimidate the left and convince potential guerrilla supporters to remain neutral. Kidnapping of rural social workers, medical personnel, and campesinos became common between 1979-83. Often innocent victims were accused of being insurgents by military commissioners, other village leaders or an individual’s personal enemies or business competitors. (…) In the cities, out of frustration from the judiciary’s unwillingness to convict and sentence insurgents, and convinced that kidnapping of suspected insurgents and their relatives would lead to a quick destruction of the guerrilla urban networks, the security forces began to systematically kidnap anyone suspected of insurgent connections. This tactic was successful. Most of the insurgent infrastructure in Guatemala City was eliminated by 1984.

The Guatemalan Civil War ended formally in 1996. But violence did not. According to national newspaper Siglo XXI, in the last fourteen months, an average of 17.6 persons have been killed every day. How many during the 36 years of civil war? 15.2.

Thursday, 19 March 2009

Truth, finally. Maybe

Guatemalan newspaper La Hora affirms that, for the first time, the  government will hand to the ministerio público (attorney general) the military archives regarding cases of genocide occurred during the civil war (1960-1996). The decision was taken after the constitutional court notification to president Álvaro Colom.  In particular, the military files concern the campaign plans named “Victoria 82”, “Firmeza 83” and the operational plans named “Ixil” (1982) and “Sofía” (July 15, 1982).

So far, it is not known when this will happen. But the Secretary of peace, Orlando Blanco, confirmed that this will happened.

The archives will effect the trial for violation of human rights and genocide, began in 2000, against the former presidents of Guatemala Lucas García and Ríos Montt.

According to the Comisión para el Esclarecimiento Histórico, during the Guatemala civil war (conflicto armado interno) 200,000 people had been killed . Most of them (93%) were victims of state security forces and most of them (83%) were Maya. Between 500,000 and 1.5 million people were displaced.

Friday, 20 February 2009

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RSS r-bloggers.com

  • Writing Functions to Automate Repetitive Plotting Tasks in ggplot2
    Introduction Making Multiple Plots on the Same Subject Preparing the Data Writing Functions to Generate Multiple Plots Making Custom Plot Themes Updating Plot Themes Introduction There are often situations when you need to perform repetitive plotting tasks. For example, you’d like to plot the same kind of data (e....
  • Expand broom::tidy() output for categorical parameter estimates
    Introduction The tidycat package includes the tidy_categorical() function to expand broom::tidy() outputs for categorical parameter estimates. Documentation For full documentation, see the package vignette: The tidycat package: expand broom::tidy() output for categorical parameter estimates Hello World The tidy() function in the broom package takes the messy output ...
  • RcppSimdJson 0.1.0: Now on Windows, With Parsers and Faster Still!
    A smashing new RcppSimdJson release 0.1.0 containing several small updates to upstream simdjson (now at 0.4.6) in part triggered by very excisting work by Brendan who added actual parser from file and string—and together with Daniel upstream worked...
  • Drunk-under-the-lamppost testing
    I’m writing a response here to Abraham Mathews’s post, Best practices for code review, R edition, because my comment there didn’t show up and I think the topic’s important. Mathews’s post starts out on the right track, then veers away from best practices in the ...
  • xspliner: An R Package to Build Explainable Surrogate ML Models
    This talk was presented virtually at eRum 2020 by Appsilon engineer Krystian Igras. Here is a direct link to the video. Why Should We Explain Black Box ML Models? A vast majority of state-of-the-art ML algorithms are black boxes, meaning it is difficult to understand their inner workings. The more that ...

RSS Simply Statistics

  • Asymptotics of Reproducibility
    Every once in a while, I see a tweet or post that asks whether one should use tool X or software Y in order to “make their data analysis reproducible”. I think this is a reasonable question because, in part, there are so many good tools out there! This is undeniably a good thing and […]
  • Amplifying people I trust on COVID-19
    Like a lot of people, I’ve been glued to various media channels trying to learn about the latest with what is going on with COVID-19. I have also been frustrated - like a lot of people - with misinformation and the deluge of preprints and peer reviewed material. Some of this information is critically important […]
  • Is Artificial Intelligence Revolutionizing Environmental Health?
    NOTE: This post was written by Kevin Elliott, Michigan State University; Nicole Kleinstreuer, National Institutes of Health; Patrick McMullen, ScitoVation; Gary Miller, Columbia University; Bhramar Mukherjee, University of Michigan; Roger D. Peng, Johns Hopkins University; Melissa Perry, The George Washington University; Reza Rasoulpour, Corteva Agriscience, and Elizabeth Boyle, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. […]

RSS Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science

  • Drunk-under-the-lamppost testing
    I’m writing a response here to Abraham Mathews’s post, Best practices for code review, R edition, because my comment there didn’t show up and I think the topic’s important. Mathews’s post starts out on the right track, then veers away from best practices in the section “What code should be reviewed?” where he says, …In […]
  • “Time Travel in the Brain”
    Natalie Biderman and Daphna Shohamy wrote this science article for kids. Here’s the abstract: Do you believe in time travel? Every time we remember something from the past or imagine something that will happen in the future, we engage in mental time travel. Scientists discovered that, whether we mentally travel back into the past or […]
  • Statistical controversy on estimating racial bias in the criminal justice system
    1. Background A bunch of people have asked me to comment on these two research articles: Administrative Records Mask Racially Biased Policing, by Dean Knox, Will Lowe, and Jonathan Mummolo: Researchers often lack the necessary data to credibly estimate racial discrimination in policing. In particular, police administrative records lack information on civilians police observe but […]